Friday, September 21, 2012

Final moving day for my orchids

     There have been many posts before this one about our orchids in bloom.  In almost every "bloom" post, I probably mentioned that I have been in the process of moving my entire orchid collection from "clay pots hanging in our shadehouse" to being "mounted in our trees pot-free".  I have lost over half of my collection due to my negligence of re-potting, fertilizing, fungiciding, etc.  And anyone with a handful of orchids knows what a tedious and expensive job that can be.  Plus orchids do sooooo much better au natural.  Finally I had some time last weekend to move the last twenty to their final destination's.

     So while my boyfriend removed the old chainlink fence & cleaned out the clutter on the side of the house, I freed the root bound orchids from their clay pot shackles & into the trees they went.  A few of the vanda species found homes on our wood fence.  Where was this epiphany when I started collecting orchids?!?   I guess everything has a rhyme, a reason and a time!
Laeliocattleya in our cattley guava tree lol
     I zip tied them to the black ironwood tree branches.  But I am in a mental debate about it, in the past I have used a few dollar store pantyhose or bath scrunchie's to wrap the roots in sphagnum to the branch.  There are two trains of thought here...to zip-tie or to scrunchie.   Zip-tie pro's:  very easy to install, holds orchids tightly to trees, allows for good drainage & air circulation.   Zip-tie con's:  if they aren't monitored they can cut into the tree branch as it grows, they don't last long due to the sun & can pop off before the roots have a chance to grow on to the tree and need constant watering to start root growth.

     Then there is the pantyhose/bath scrunchie pro's:  inexpensive, one pair can be used for many orchids, can hold sphagnum moss to help keep moisture on roots.  Pantyhose/bath scrunchie con's:  they have to be constantly monitored for breakthroughs, can hold too much moisture & can restrict air flow which can lead to bacteria growth, you still have to use zip-ties or thick string to attach them and once the roots start to grow they growth right through the hose/scrunchie & then you have bits of material in your orchid roots on the tree, ewww.  So I think I am going to stick with the zip tie's for now but would love to hear all about your experiences with mounting orchids, bromeliads & airplants into trees!

     With out further adieu...here are a few snap shots of my orchid collection in their final locations mounted in the trees, palms and on our fence.  Sit down, relax, hope you enjoy and are inspired! :)
Some of our orchids in the black ironwood tree

Another view of the orchids in the black ironwood tree

Orchids in our Jamaican caper tree

Cattleya in our Jamaican caper

Vanda's & dendrobium's on our triple veitchia palm

Miltassa orchid on another triple veitchia of ours

Bird's eye view of the orchids in the black ironwood tree

'No name' orchid close up from in the previous picture

Maxillaria tenuifolia (flowers smells like toasted coconut) in our lignum vitae tree

Dendrobium's on our double adonidia palm
             
             Close up of one of the pink blush
              dendrobium's in the above picture
   
   Another close up of one of the purple
dendrobium's in the above picture

Blc. Rustic Spots (Bl. Richard Mueller x C. Landate) in the cattley guava tree

L. tenebrosa 'maravilla' in the guava tree

                
                 The one in the middle is
                 Vanda Lamellata var. remediosae
V. Lamellata var. remediosae close up
The flowers smell super sweet!

Another 'no name' vanda species
A close up of the little vanda cutie

Ok so this cattleya didn't make the trees
yet but it surprised me by blooming early
A close up of this October bloomer.
It's a deep orange that gets lighter as it ages.

Pot. Netrasiri 'orange delight' in our guava tree
can you see it!?! LOL :)
This Netrasiri is so hard to photograph!
The colors are super saturated & intense.
Pot. Netrasiri 'orange delight'

lc. gold digger 'redland gold' x c. schilleriana'

Blc. Dennis Kone AM/AOS close up
Blc. Dennis Kone AM/AOS this orchid has doubled in size!

This 'no name' cattleya blooms the exact same time as the blc. dennis kone!
Yes this orchid should be busted outta this crate but I'll wait
until it finishes blooming 

This amazing orchid is in our lignum vitae
I think it's part of the brassavola family
Yes I lost the tag, lol
So here you have it folks...a glimpse into the life of orchids at our humble abode.
Of course I will do a follow up post as to the status of how everything is doing with the
hopes that all newly transplanted orchids will start attaching their roots to the trunks!

Happy Gardening & wishing everyone a most wonderful weekend!!!
Best wishes,

Sheri
xoxo

12 comments:

  1. beautiful.and what care do they have to recieve? what happends when it gets below 50? I live in the middleofthe state...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sharon, really not much care at all. I definitely have to make sure they get enough water to promote new root growth onto the trees but we have been lucky to have had a wet & humid summer. My experience so far has been that the handful of orchids I had in the trees did remarkably well in contrast to those I had in pots during our cold weather. So the idea sparked...move them all into the their natural setting. Most of my orchids are warm weather orchids but even our native Florida orchids have survived hundreds of years through frost temps. Soooo...yup we will see how they do their first winter lol! Will most definitely keep you posted! Do you have any orchids? How do you prep your plants for winter, any suggestions? Hope you have a great weekend!

      Best wishes,

      Sheri

      Delete
  2. What gorgeous orchids! I grow them here in Central Florida in an "orchid" house because we tend to have several days below freezing here and I have to move them indoors (my garage). Although my collection pales significantly compared to yours. :-)

    eli

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, thank you so much for such sweet sentiments Eli! Believe it of not I used to move them all inside when they were potted but turns out they do so much better on their own in their own environment. So this winter will be the test, lol! What kind of plants do you have in Central Florida? Hope you have a great weekend!

      Best wishes,

      Sheri

      Delete
  3. Sheri I have been procrastinating for the last few years to do that as well. You have some very beautiful orchids. I have lost many due to neglect as well. Well you have given me the inspiration to get going. Take care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you kidding Helen, lol, you have an incredibly amazing collection! You are constantly inspiring me to view things in a new creative way. You go girl! Hope you have some R&R this weekend!

      Best wishes,

      Sheri

      Delete
  4. OMG....how lucky are you...
    We would only dream of having orchids in our gardens up here...
    Great job...look forward to their progress...

    Cheers!
    Linda :o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so sweet Linda! Will gladly trade you a few for some of your cool weather, lol. Hope you have a wonderful lakeside weekend! :)

      Best wishes,

      Sheri

      Delete
  5. What beauties you have! I have a very small collection. I hope your do well in their new locations.

    FlowerLady

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Lorraine, so glad you stopped by! I just adore your musings and your wonderful stitchery! My heart is filled with lots of good thoughts & prayers for you and your loved ones! :)

      Happy Gardening & many best wishes,

      Sheri

      Delete
  6. Awesome collection! We use clear fishing line many times when we mount orchids (it is inconspicuous and strong) and hang Spanish moss around the roots to keep moisture around them for longer. Might be something to experiment with!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Rick! I will definitely have to try the fishing line but how do you secure it so it stays tight...tie it in knots, melt it? The Spanish moss doesn't seem to grow really well here. Not sure if it's too salty and/or heat & humidity play a factor but it does amazingly well in north and central Florida. I have used sphagnum moss in the past but it just seems to fall to the ground when it dries out so it's a waste. I have noticed that as long as the orchids get enough water & the zip tie's keep the orchids tight to the tree, the roots attach to the tree pretty quickly. Wishing you a wonderful week!

      Best wishes,
      Sheri

      Delete